Religious Commitments and Clinical Practices: A National Physician Survey

Brief Description: We mailed a questionnaire to 1000 primary care US physicians. The questionnaire included multiple different measures of physicians' religious characteristics, along with items on spirituality in medicine, morally controversial practices, and other measures on which we expected religion-associated variations. The priamry aim of the study was to better determine which religious measures best account for religion-associated variations in physicians' attitudes and practices, across several major religious affiliations. Secondary goals were to explore physicians' ideas about their role in clinical decision-making and how they should handle patient requests for morally controversial clinical interventions. In addition, we piloted a novel sampling strategy to increase representation of Jewish, Hindu and Muslim physicians.

Funding: This study was supported by a grant from the Greenwall Foundation (New York, NY) and the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (1 K23 AT002749, to Dr. Curlin).

Instrument: Religious Commitments and Clinical Practices: A National Physician Survey